Great Expectations

Ever heard someone say, “There’s no such thing as a short-sleeve dress shirt”?

The pocket protector crowd (think of Dilbert) might disagree with that statement, but those who know far more about workplace apparel than I do accept it as gospel. To quote anchorman Ron Burgundy, “It’s a given.”

There are many “givens” in business. Time is money. You only get one chance to make a good first impression. Cash is king.

Here’s another one to add to the list:

“If you’re the owner, nobody cares as much as you.”

Many business owners haven’t yet heard this valuable fact. Or, they’ve heard it and refuse to believe it. As a result, they have unrealistically high expectations for their people. Then, when their employees fall short of these lofty expectations, the owner is disappointed, surprised and maybe even angered.

Ultimately, in a situation like this, the employee leaves – either voluntarily or through termination for “poor performance.” Of course, the owner’s expectations were never clearly defined, never written down, never explained and were very likely a moving target.

Let’s run down the list of what the business means to a typical entrepreneur. We’ll call him Bob. For Bob, the business is:

  • a source of income for him and his family, now and into the future.
  • his single largest chunk of wealth, exceeding the equity in his home.
  • a vehicle to fund his interests, such as charitable giving and playing golf with business associates.
  • Bob’s way to set his own direction, be his own boss, and pave his own path.
  • his baby. He had the idea, launched it, nurtured it, and grew it into what it is today.
  • his future retirement. Someday, when he’s ready, he’ll sell it and use that cash to fund his golden years.
  • a source of pride. Much of Bob’s ego is tied up in the company’s growth and performance.

Now let’s make a list of what the company means to Joe, one of Bob’s employees:

  • It’s a job.

OK, Joe may think of it as a career. Joe may be emotionally attached to the company and may be a big part of its success. Even so, you have to admit that Joe’s list is much different than Bob’s.

Here’s my point: Business owners must adjust their expectations to the givens of the workplace. If you learn to accept “Nobody cares as much as you” as a given, you’ll save yourself from the inevitable aggravation and consternation: Anger. Firing. Recruiting. Rehiring. Retraining. Low morale. Missed opportunities.

Get real and get used to it. Nobody cares as much as you. It’s a given.

Some readers may find this attitude to be in contrast with my position that employees can think and act like owners. It is not. Many employees can and do think and act like owners. They will rise to the challenge and accomplish the most incredible things. I see it all the time. But there is one indisputable difference between an owner and an employee:

If the business fails, the employee experiences a job-changing event. But for the owner, failure is a life-changing event, potentially bringing total financial ruin on the owner’s family.

Yes, employees can be wonderfully loyal, incredibly hard-working and intensely dedicated. But the fact remains that if and when the hammer comes down on the business, it is the owner who takes the biggest blow. It stands to reason, then, that the person with the most on the line – with all respect to faithful employees – will care the most. After all, the owner’s connection to the business goes far beyond livelihood and career.

Consider the following simple formula for effective leadership:

  1. Have realistic expectations for your employees.
  2. Make your expectations known.

So, do what it takes to foster loyalty, hard work and dedication among your team. Return their gift of loyalty by being loyal in return. Create a win-win work environment. Share information and solicit their opinions. Thank them for a job well done and reward them for exceeding goals.

Help them learn to think and act like owners. But remember, they are not owners. You’re the owner. Don’t blame your employees for drawing a line.

Again, have realistic expectations. You owe it to your employees, to your business and to yourself.

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