Got Drama? Act 2

No-Drama-Button

 

“Don’t tell me what they say about me.
Tell me why they feel comfortable telling you.”
— Unknown

To review Act 1, we defined workplace drama as gossip, finger-pointing, whining, bickering and more.

You may be savoring a business which is not infected with the rot of workplace drama. If so, congratulations. Keep up the good work.

Some of you, though, fight the fires of discontent daily. You spend an inordinate amount of time dealing with drama in all its insidious forms. It kills the productivity and potential of the entire company, and sends you home drained. And, any “A Players” you were lucky enough to hire? They’re out of Dodge on the first available train.

Sound like your workplace? If so, go back to read and implement the recommendations from Act 1. That will put the foundations in place for curing this plague.

Then read on for ways to wade directly into the fray and wage combat wh your Nattering Nay-Bobs.

Circle the troops. Look ‘em in the eye. Tell them that you ask for and expect everyone’s full support for a new start. All the drama and nonsense stops today! Be firm.

Then, go over your new rules. Make them crystal clear and non-negotiable. Here’s a list to jump-start your thinking:

  • Treat everyone the way you’d like to be treated OR the way THEY want to be treated … whichever is better.
  • Attack the problem, not the person.
  • Don’t say anything about a person you wouldn’t say in their presence.
  • Zero tolerance for drama, talking behind someone’s back, etc. If someone tries to engage you in such a discussion, refuse to participate. If they have a problem with someone, tell them to discuss it directly with that person, take it to their supervisor or to the other person’s supervisor. If you listen to the drama you’re just as guilty as the person spewing it.
  • When we’re in a meeting and we ask if there are any questions or comments, we REALLY do want your feedback. If you’re unwilling to share your comments in the meeting, then get with your manager afterward. If you’re still unwilling to speak up, you lose the right to complain back in the workplace. If someone complains about a topic we just covered in a meeting, don’t listen. Tell ‘em to take it to management.

Whenever there’s a flare-up, deal with it swiftly. Speak with the offender directly. Don’t set up more rules or punish everyone because of one person’s actions.

Be willing to have this conversation: “Despite our best efforts, you continue to be unhappy here. Maybe we should help you transition to a place of employment that you find more acceptable.”

Warning: If you establish “zero tolerance” and then turn your head the other way, you’ll lose your credibility. Be prepared to enforce it!

Next time, we’ll talk about keeping score. Assigning accountability for numbers eliminates much workplace drama. This is just one of the ways GGOB really shines in helping you craft a winning culture.

 

 

 

Got Drama? Act 1

work-hard-have-fun-and-no-drama-pleaseDo you have drama in your company?

“Drama” covers a myriad of people issues … gossip, finger-pointing, whining, talking behind folks’ backs, can’t/won’t get along, complaining, blame, excuses, under-performing, bickering and more.

If you’re embarking on the Great Game of Business journey, here’s some good news: GGOB is a culture transformation. It’s all about building a culture of winning and learning.

Some organizations have deep-seated people issues, and I find that leaders in this situation like to try to resolve some of their issues as a run-up to launching GGOB.

Even though GGOB itself is a good portion of the cure for what ails your organization, let’s talk about some approaches to removing drama, and for keeping it out in the first place.

Since an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, let’s first talk about preventing as much drama as possible so we don’t have to correct it.

Culture and good hiring go hand in hand. It’s much like the chicken and egg. Which comes first? One begets the other.

A strong, positive culture is exemplified by employees who know they have a good thing going, and who want to keep out the bad ones while welcoming in the good ones. If your hiring process indeed keeps out those who don’t fit your culture, that’s way more than half the battle.

I’ve written quite a bit about the importance of a “culture document” before. A set of Core Values can be invaluable IF they are genuinely used to guide decisions about hiring, firing, promoting and rewarding. If they’ll just be hollow words or a plaque on the wall, don’t bother.

Once you know what values are important, the company’s leaders must set the tone (and the example), educate the troops, and be unwavering in running the business according to these principles.

Here are some ideas for getting your management team on board:

  • Our Core Values apply to everyone in the company. ALL decisions are made with our values in mind.
  • Set the example
  • Hold others accountable. Do it tactfully and professionally, but do it.
  • Speak up in our management meetings. Debate is healthy as long as we keep it professional and not mean-spirited. We don’t need “yes-people” or nattering nay-bobs.
  • Once a decision is made we each support it as fully as if it was our own idea, both among the other managers and especially with all others in the company. Acting like you support an idea and then undermining it or not supporting it in front of employees is not acceptable.
  • Let’s issue an “Adult Card” to everybody in the company … starting with the CEO and our management team. If there’s a problem, we deal with it like the mature professionals we are: with open, honest, direct communications.
  • You can’t just say all this once and think it’s fixed. You’ll have to remind folks over and over. And over.

Hatim Tyabji grew Verifone into a dominant, global credit card transaction company. His key leadership tool was a booklet that explained Verifone’s eight core values. He says, “I essentially spent the last six years repeating myself.”

A stellar smaller example is Sandy Jaffe, who grew his tiny Paperback Supply into GL Group, an admired local multi-divisional company in St. Louis (and GGOB All-Star winner) with over 200 employees. Their main guiding principle over the last 40 years? The Golden Rule.

In Act 2, we’ll talk about taking the message to the rest of the company.