What’s Your Number?

numbers

“What gets measured gets managed.”

 It’s hard to argue with that piece of wisdom. That said, here’s another old saw to consider:

“If everything is important, then nothing is important.”

Between these two valuable quotes is a balance and a guideline for business owners.

All businesses have certain numbers that define success. Some, like profit, are universal. Every business must take in more than it spends, so an argument could be made that this number – profit – is a definition of success for every business.

But what about other numbers? There’s certainly no shortage of other things to measure – sales, costs, margins, cash … the list goes on and on.

They’re all important. But don’t forget: “If everything is important, then nothing is important.”

Focusing on a small, carefully-selected handful of numbers and actually doing things to improve them is much more likely to lead to overall success than scattershot oversight of dozens of different numbers.

Some business owners create a scoreboard or “dashboard” of metrics – to pull selected numbers out of the blizzard of income statements, balance sheets and other reports – and single them out for an appropriate amount of attention.

This is how the “What gets measured gets managed” piece comes into play.

So, how do you cut through the scads of potential metrics which might be worthy of your undivided attention, and discover the select few which will truly make a difference?

Think about your business. Two questions:

1)    Are there things related to your specific business model that are absolutely critical to ongoing success? For instance, if you are the low price leader, then cost of sales is likely a primary area of focus.

2)    Are there things going on in your business right now that deserve attention? Examples might include things like declining quality, too much dependence on one customer, or high employee turnover.

If you find that there are specific things that warrant a permanent place on your scoreboard, then add them and leave them there. Or, perhaps you’ll discover that a temporary issue needs attention – so it gets a spot, only until it is resolved.

In most cases, these big-picture, corporate-level “critical numbers” will have underlying “drivers” – activities which must be done to move the number in the right direction. A simple example: weight loss. If your critical number is pounds, the drivers would be calories in (eating) and calories burned (exercise.)

The best drivers measure activities and behaviors, as in this weight loss example. If you want to change a number, you’ve got to change someone’s activities or behaviors.

These are the numbers that deserve a significant amount of time and attention. That’s not to say other numbers aren’t important. They’re just not as important.

Identify and break out your critical numbers and drivers. Get them on a scoreboard for all to see. Talk about them. Teach and learn about them. Assign responsibility for them. Track them. Most importantly, be sure to move them in the right direction.

Your business will be more successful for the effort.

It’s the Spread

“Thirty six thousand dollars!”

“You’re proposing to pay him thirty six thousand dollars a year? We can’t afford that.”

“It will be tight, but I’m pretty sure that’s what it will take to get him. I really like this candidate.”

Discussions such as this happen all the time in small businesses. The company is in a hiring mode, the recruiting and interviewing has happened, and now it’s time to narrow it down to a specific candidate and make an offer.

It can be agonizing. I’ve been there and I’ll bet you have, too. Help is desperately needed but the best candidate seems too expensive. Heck, maybe any candidate seems too expensive.

Let’s listen in on the discussion the other interested parties in this situation are having:

“Thirty six thousand dollars!”

“Honey, you were making forty thousand when you were laid off. I don’t think we can afford to accept thirty six.”

“It will be tight, but I’m pretty sure that’s the best they can do. I really like this company.”

Two sets of people on either side of a salary negotiation. Both are looking at the same number and of course considering things from their vantage point, and with their own interests in mind.

The number they’re all focused on – annual salary – is the number we all use. Employers use annual salary to measure the cost to the company, and employees use it as the measure of compensation received.

But let’s dig deeper. What’s the real, full cost to the company for a $36,000 per year employee?

Salary                               $36,000
Plus payroll taxes           $  3,750
Plus benefits                    $  6,000
Total cost to company:  $45,750

What appears to be a $36,000 cost is in reality going to cost the company almost $46,000.

Now, let’s look at the employee’s side of the ledger.

Salary                                                           $36,000
Less payroll taxes                                        $  2,754
Less income tax withholdings                    $  7,200
Less employee’s share of benefits cost     $  1,000
Employee take-home:                                 $25,046

To drive home the point:

Employer cost                                  $45,750
Less employee take-home              $25,046
Difference                                          $20,704

That’s quite a spread between the company’s actual cost and the employee’s actual spendable net.

I suggest that these are the two numbers that deserve the attention of the folks involved. In this light, the annual salary almost becomes meaningless.

Yet, time and energy are spent negotiating a number that has little real-life importance.

I know – we won’t stop talking about annual salary. Too much pride is tied up in that number, and it is admittedly a convenient yardstick.

To me, the big deal is the spread. Here are the take-aways:

  •  Employees deserve to know what it costs their company to employ them, and the total value of their compensation package. Let’s tell ‘em.
  • Both employers and employees can help reduce the spread. For instance, employers can choose pre-tax benefits, reducing payroll tax. Employees can make healthy choices and wisely spend deductibles and company-provided benefit dollars.

I’d rather spend my time cooperating with employees to reduce the spread than arguing over annual salary. How about you?